PCOS In Young Girls

The Following is a Guest Post

PCOSDiva is one of the websites that helped me get started on my journey back to wellness.  This post was very informative, and I wanted to pass the information on to you.

Guest Post by Dr. Felice L. Gersh

Most doctors and patients alike believe that PCOS is a condition which appears in the teen years or with young adulthood, following 360px-IrishAmericanGirlthe advent of puberty and the onset of periods. In reality, shocking as it may seem, PCOS begins with birth!!

Now how, you may ask, can that happen? Doesn’t puberty herald the onset of the all the medical challenges faced by young women with PCOS? The answer to that question is…. mostly so… but there are signs and symptoms early on, and there can be early detection!

Here is the story of the beginnings of PCOS, and with this knowledge comes the capability to predict with reasonable, if not perfect, accuracy whether or not your daughter will develop PCOS. With that knowledge comes the power to begin treating it BEFORE all the misery that you know all too well ensues, following the completion of puberty.

While in utero, because of the ubiquitous toxins surrounding us all, everyone becomes exposed to numerous chemicals, including ones which act as endocrine disruptors, particularly Bisphenol A (BPA). Such exposures alter the very foundational development and function of hormone receptors. What happens is that these chemicals enter the pregnant woman’s body through various means and then cross the placenta, thereby entering  the baby’s body, where it actually concentrates in greater quantity than in the mom’s body! This sad fact has only been recently realized! Researchers, measuring the chemical levels in the moms, often found low levels and concluded they were below the threshold to cause problems, while being unaware that the levels of that chemical were actually much higher within the baby.

Chemical endocrine disruptors are like cheap knock-off imitations of real hormones. They can attach to receptors and act in one of many ways-mimicking the real hormone, blocking the action of the hormone, or something in between. And estrogen has three different kinds of receptors, so the end result can be hormone chaos and the various organs of the developing baby’s body simply do not get the right exposure to hormones, particularly estrogen.  The baby is born with a “confused” hormonal system, unable to respond properly to the hormones due to the abnormal function of their receptors, as well as the inability to manufacture them properly.

When there is a problem with the functioning of the estrogen receptors, systemic inflammation occurs. This occurs because estrogen functions as the master of metabolic homeostasis. What that means is that estrogen controls a female’s appetite, energy usage, metabolic rate, location of fat deposits, and how fat functions. Estrogen is truly the mastermind of all that is female and metabolic!

Young girls born to PCOS moms have about a 50% chance of developing PCOS themselves. Given those odds, it is really imperative for us to diagnose, with some reasonable probability, which of those daughters will and which won’t have to deal with PCOS. And there are ways to reasonably identify young girls as having a high predilection to develop PCOS.

From a physical point of view, here are the suspicious symptoms. If a very young girl, from approximately age 4 to 12 years of age, has an unusual amount of waist and belly fat, yet she eats quite well… that is a powerful clue. Estrogen regulates where fat is deposited and how it functions, so young girls destined to get PCOS may be showing signs of abnormal fat deposition and already have difficulty maintaining a healthy weight, well before puberty sets in.

There is also a blood test which has good predictability for detecting PCOS prone girls and which can be administered as early as age 6 to make a likely diagnosis! This test is called Adiponectin. I order it through the Cleveland HeartLab, a very prestigious cardiovascular laboratory, affiliated with the renowned Cleveland Clinic. Adiponectin is a type of hormone made by adipose (fat) tissue, called an Adipokine. Adiponectin is an extremely important and vital hormone to prevent inflammation, insulin resistance, and obesity. It is involved in managing how fat tissue functions, the level of inflammation in the body, how energy is produced and stored, and the transport of glucose from the blood into cells, impacting insulin resistance. Estrogen controls the production of Adiponectin. In girls prone to develop PCOS, the Adiponectin levels will be unusually low.

The finding of low Adiponectin levels raises a big red flag that the girl is at high risk to develop PCOS. The potential for Adiponectin to be used as an early screening tool means that girls at high risk to develop PCOS can be identified as young as age 6! Once identified, proactive therapies can be initiated to lower the chance of PCOS becoming severe. Lifestyle changes involving diet, sleep, stress, exercise, and nutrition can all be implemented to greatly soften the blow to health which occurs with the passage through puberty.

I would be happy to assist any who have daughters they would like evaluated for PCOS risk status. I can see and examine them and order Adiponectin, as well as all indicated inflammation testing. I strongly advocate for a proactive approach to all diseases in order to prevent the devastating effects of an advanced disease state. This philosophy is particularly applicable to PCOS to ameliorate the suffering so many with the condition must endure.

Dr. Felice Gersh is one of only a small number of fellowship trained integrative gynecologists in the nation. She blends the best of the world of natural and holistic medicine with state of the art functional and allopathic medical treatment. Because of her extensive knowledge of the complex inter-relationships of the body’s organs, she recognizes the need to investigate all aspects of health, always working to re-establish a healthy gastrointestinal tract, adequate sleep, good mood, great nutrition, high energy, and balanced hormones.

Expert in all areas of women’s health, and particularly of gynecological and reproductive matters, Dr. Gersh deals in an integrative manner with such uniquely female issues as polycystic ovary disease (PCOS).

She is currently writing a book on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and writing a chapter on the same topic for a medical textbook.

You may contact Dr. Gersh at:

Integrative Medical Group of Irvine, 4968 Booth Circle, Suite 101, Irvine, California 92604

Website: www.integrativemgi.com DrGersh 2014.2

Email: mail@integrativemgi.com

Phone: 949-753-7475

 

 

Please like, share, and comment if you enjoyed!Wishing you Health & Blessings,Laura

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